20th-Century Virginia
20th-Century Virginia Wrapup
/ Task

Virginia’s slow move to integrate
High
Students will research massive resistance and the struggles to get a decent education in Virginia for it’s African American students.
Students will read biographies of African American from Virginia in the 20th century and create fictional(historical fiction) diaries of a student from this time period.
Applying Lessons Learned
High
I will broaden my civil rights unit to include more details about busing and integrating schools as well as local instances of desegregating schools.
Virginia's Growth into the 20th Century
High
Using a series of photographs and historical documents given to students to study, I would lead a discussion into how Virginia resisted the spirit of Reconstruction through Democrat Party Policies of Jim Crow, and how these policies eroded to gains, given and taken by freed Blacks to fully integrate into American society.
Indirect Applications
Elementary
In the 5th Grade SOL's that we teach in Virginia we do not arrive at the 20th Century. With that said I could not create a unit of study for this directly, but I think it is critical for students throughout the study of Virginia to always critically question any historically biased attempt to silence or underrepresent any group of people. I think we must always encourage and allow students to ask 'who does this benefit?' when analyzing historical documents. Throughout the history of Virginia and our nation in general laws, political opportunity, and economic opportunity have not been equally distributed amongst all people. This is why we have desegregation laws ob the books, why we have Plessy V. Ferguson and Brown V. Board of Education. Therefore we must challenge all students to think critically about all topics and analyze how legal, political, and economic gerrymandering impacts the lives of people and to develop clear arguments against the developments that are not equitable in there formation or application.
English 11
High
Again, I will be able to give students more historical context as we read stories and other works from this era. The literature has branched out more into other parts of America by this time in history; however, keeping a context of Virginia will make it more relevant for them. I know of an older African-American gentleman who remembers not being allowed to ride the school bus even on very cold days and being taunted by the white students as he and his classmates walked to the "black" school. It might be relevant for him to come and relate his story to prove that it wasn't more than a lifetime ago that these inequalities were standard and in place even in our region.
Fight for Equality
High
The first section that would be applied to my course, would be an analysis of the various Black Codes and Jim Crow laws that were passed within Virginia. These laws could be utilized as a primary source that could be analyzed, and then the students could then build upon the impact of these laws upon the community. Similarly, students could be provided an excerpt from 'The Hollow Hope' to provide insight into the experience of achieving civil rights victories that are not fully fulfilled (i.e. Brown v. Board). Finally, primary sources may be utilized to demonstrate the struggle for equality faced by African Americans and women within Virginia, which could then be paralleled to the compounded struggle faced by African American women.
The Changes that needed to happen
Elementary
There is a lot of information over a period of time. With that said, a timeline filled with articles, postcards, photos, and short essays that could be displayed for the students to see and share what they have learned. After the timeline is complete, I would ask the students to create a set of questions that all of this or even part of the timeline creates. This will enlist critical thinking into historical settings.
Change comes slowly in Virginia
High
Have students study Jim Crow Laws of Virginia that limited racial, cultural, economic, social, educational and political change in Virginia and have them describe in writing and a timeline how the state damaged itself and its citizens with these laws of discrimination.
Timeline
Elementary
As a small group, using authentic text and multiple sources such as letters, maps, court cases, and other documents, the students would work with a partner to create a timeline showing important events that led to the changes in VA during the 20th c.
Black and White in Film
High
I could show and discuss the movies "Remember the Titans" and "Hidden Figures." The former is about forced desegregation of a school and its football team in Virginia. The latter is about female African-Americans integral to NASA's early successes. One of the women lived and taught school right here in my county.
20th Century Va.
Middle
I would begin with former Gov. Wilder and his compaigning in the area. He received some good press for jumping up in the back of a pick up truck with some locals. I was fortunate enough to have met him a few times during the time.
I am fortunate to have an aide in out school whose father drove the segregated bus in our county. She is a great primary source to use.
I would try to use local history publications showing the change in our area and connect to relatives many students have in northern Virginia due to jobs.
Despite the Civil War and freeing of the slaves the was not equality of the races.
I teach that our coalminers were treated as slaves, or worse, by many coal operators in the early 1900's as they had no value and could be replaced easily.
20th Century Virginia - Then and Now
Elementary
Students can create a sway to share their research on 20th-century Virginia.
Something Must Be Done with Prince Edward county
High
I have taught this book, "Something Must Be Done About Prince Edward County" in my 11th grade History class, where the students were asked to read this book, written by Kristen Green, a product of Prince Edward County at this time, as she looks at both her research methods as well as her personal feelings as she journeys through this time in history for where she grew up. And in class, we look at all the legal aspects of the time period, what desegregation looks like throughout the nation, all the different court cases, and the way things look today. We finished with a time with the Author, as she is local to our school district. This is a lesson I would like to repeat, and I would like to enlist the English teachers to help me with it, providing a more interdisciplinary element to this lesson.
20th Century Virginia Classroom Connections
Elementary
Here are a few ways to incorporate things learned from this module into my 4th grade Virginia Studies Classroom.
1. Famous Virginians of the 20th century - students create human cutouts of famous Virginias. Students research SOL facts and fun/interesting biographical facts about each person. Students then share out what they learned, discovered, or review with class.
2. Look at pictures from the 20th century and examine if the picture is showing discrimination or segregation. This will allow students to recognize how both discrimination and segregation were present in everyday lives of many African Americans during the 20th Century.
3. Review school policies in place during segregation, desegregation, and Massive Resistance. Have students compare the schools from the the 20th century to schools and policies today.
February Black History Month Wax Museum
Middle
Students could research important people, create and wear clothing similar to their person, and give a speech to those who pass by them like in a wax museum.
20th. Century Virginia
Middle
The information contained in this module will form a major component of the content in my classroom. One piece of evidence I will make much use of will be the newspaper story about counties that applied for tuition assistance to send students(white) to private schools. One of the counties was Warren, which is the county I teach in. Warren County shut down in 1959, and the majority of whites went to the private schools in the area. Even in 2020, there is bitterness about integration.
History is happening now
High
My students are up to date on social media, the news, and popular culture, so if I try to sell the implied thesis of this essay--that Virginia's struggles with racial equality just ended with the election of Douglas Wilder in the 80s, they will know better and not buy it.
The discussion needs to be not just about how far we've come but also about how far we have to go.
Ongoing inequalities in the prison systems, policing, school funding across districts, job opportunities, and in many other areas obviously persist: hence the surge in protests across the country now.
The conversations can get dicey, and are a challenge to manage and keep civil, but must take place in our schools if we're to keep these subjects relevant to our students' actual experiences.

20th Century VA
High
I made this point in the past to divide the five geographic regions. Give groups of students each region to see how it has developed into the 21st century. Groups could include in their presentation how politics, social. economics, and population patterns have change.

I would also focus on the case in in Prince Edward County in regards to Brown Vs Board of Education. Something that I have failed to implement.
20th Century Virginia Video Recap
Elementary
One way that I may apply 20th Century Virginia into my classroom would be to show my students videos on small Virginia milestones like the Civil Rights era and desegregation while emphasizing important figures like Martin Luther King, Jr., Rosa Parks and Maggie Walker. Allowing students to view the highlights and milestones of the 20th century can help them appreciate the freedoms that they have currently and to recognize important events and people who have helped provide these rights and freedoms for them.
Teacher
High
I will use the examples form this module as well as other primary and secondary sources to talk about how VA changed during the 20th century. I will also work to show how instrumental VA was in both the negative and positive sides of events such as the civil rights movement, school integration, and the changing economic foundations of the country.
Teaching Desegregation
High
I would have my US History and African American studies students view the picture of the African Americans being put on a segregated bus. I would have them analyze the photo. I would have them come up with 5 questions about the photo. Then, I would ask a series of questions about it. I would have them research Prince Edward schools and how it was a focal point for school desegregation.
20th-Century Virginia Classroom Connections
Elementary
The content in 20th Century Virginia can broaden and deepen my students understanding about the state in which they live. Discussions about Citizenship, Graphic Organizers comparing jobs of the Past to the Present, Student Generated Questions using images, and Interviewing a family member who lived during the time in history are all powerful tools to make learning come alive. My mother is over eighty years old and my best historian, it is always interesting to hear her account.
20th-Century Virginia Classroom Connections
Elementary
The content in 20th Century Virginia can broaden and deepen my students understanding about the state in which they live. Discussions about Citizenship, Graphic Organizers comparing jobs of the Past to the Present, Student Generated Questions using images, and Interviewing a family member who lived during the time in history are all powerful tools to make learning come alive. My mother is over eighty years old and my best historian, it is always interesting to hear her account.
Current Application
High
When talking through the Civil Rights Movement and Women's suffrage movement topics, we can use this pandemic and current situation in the United States to give an idea of how things were during the movements. Being able to connect current events, whether they are positive or negative events, with historical events always helps the students remember and retain the knowledge that is being taught.
20th Century Virginia
Elementary
This is just my second year teaching US VA History to 4th graders. I taught exactly what was in the lesson plans from my amazing coworkers. After this class and especially the 20th century information , which is my favorite part of history, I have so many more sources to pull from and more knowledge myself. I cannot wait to teach about more court cases than the big ones I knew about. I cannot wait to add more famous people in my teaching. Our art dept was awarded a grant that will allow us to travel all over Richmond and learn about some of the very famous people that made Richmond what it is today. I can't wait.
Changes
Middle
I have learned much more about the battle Virginia has gone through and is still going through to make all people equal in rights.I would use as many pictures, videos power points as I could to give visuals of the growth of Virginia. I would also like to have students work together on a large time line of the growth and changes of Virginia.
Then having students write their feelings on where we are on this timeline and where should we go. I would also have my students do a reporter/interviewer as a way of communicating the facts in their terms. Maggie Walker, among many could be an interviewee.
20th Century
Elementary
We have people in our county who actually lived through the segregation of schools and know first hand how it felt to go from a fully segregated school to integration with everyone. I'd like to have guest speakers come in and talk to my students about how times have changed over the years. I'd also like to take them on a field trip to the local museum so they can further understand how ideas and roles have changed.
Changes
High
I like to use the Disney Movie, Remember the Titans, to serve as a representation of the turmoil and times of Civil Rights. I think that the information, and the fact that this information, is viable serves as a great application for the classroom. Virginia not ratifying the 19th Amendment until 1952, the shutting down of school systems in resistance, or "White Flight" i think that kids today would be shocked to see such blatant profiling and targeting.
Segregation Photos
Elementary
I would have students observe differences between photos that contain images of segregated places. I use images of restaurants, restrooms, water fountains, and schools.
Excellent Course
Elementary
Working through this course made me realize how important it is to use primary sources and to incorporate the historical thinking strategies that were discussed in the first module. This has been an excellent professional development course, and I hope that GMU will create more courses like this in the future.
13th, 14th, 15th Amendments —- What do they mean for Va. in the 20th century?
Middle
Virginia continued to resist racial changes through most of the 20th century. School segregation, restaurant and transportation seating areas, and even water fountain and restroom usage did not reflect the laws of our country.
Comparing Schools
Elementary
I wish I could take my students on a field trip to the Robert R. Morton museam in farmville VA. IT has lots of great resources and its just neat to actually see where something has taken place. Then have them research and compare what different schools were like during the time of massive resistance. Split them up into different groups and each group research a different Virginia School and we will compare and contrast with each's groups school and of course the Robert R. Morton High school
Modern VA
High
I think that there are current racial tensions in Virginia that will give the students a different perspective on looking back. I would hope that students could recognize that racial tensions have been changing and impacting Virginia for years. Educating them on this history could become a touchy topic however it is important for them to see a big picture and learn from the history.
What's Your School Like?
Elementary
I would like to have my students compare various schools during the "separate but equal" time. I would put them in groups and assign them schools from various areas of Virginia. I would provide them with various resources to look through such as the book "The Girl from the Tar Paper School". They would discuss their findings, and complete a compare/contrast chart on the schools. We would also compare and contrast the difference in segregated rural schools to urban schools in Virginia.
Segregation vs. Desegregation
Elementary
Why was this such a controversial issue for parents, kids, and lawmakers? What were the feelings of students that were desegregated? What changed for them when they suddenly had a white or black student in their classroom? These are questions that my students will love to look into to personalize the era for them.
School Segregation
High
In a short lesson, I would have students think about school segregation. There is some very powerful digital media of the Civil Rights Era that students can explore. I might start with a warm up by having students consider their own learning environment. They can make a list of the things they need in school in order to learn. Then we'd move into a discussion of Plessy v. Ferguson (separate but equal) and school segregation in VA. Then, using the SCIM-C model, I would have students analyze pictures comparing the Worsham/Farmville High Schools to Moton High School (the National Archives has some great pictures comparing them). Students could then read about and discuss the Davis v. Prince Edward County case and watch an interview from a Prince Edward student who was an 8th grader at the time of the strike. As a class, students can circle back to the warm up question/list and compare it to what they saw in the pictures of African American schools with a focus on equality.
Segregation - An Ugly Time in Virginia
Elementary
**This is a delicate discussion topic for elementary students. Teacher will be mindful of students showing stressors.
Teacher will read the book: White Socks Only. Students will discuss why some people don't like other people because they are different from them. Teacher will ask questions that continue a gentle conversation of what makes a person different. Is it just color? Is there a way to change the mind's of people like this? Using your mindful thinking, what can we say or do for a person who isn't nice to people who may look or act differently from us? This lesson is a guided class discussion. After the discussion, the class will draw people in every color in our crayon box and hang them in the hallway.
Woodrow Wilson Middle School Roanoke City
Middle
I would first share my story of living through segregation and being moved through many schools. I would tell how this event impacted and changed my life.

I would like students to do some oral history interviews of people who lived through Civil Rights and segregation and write an essay of how schools were different and how it impacted their lives.
20th-Century Virginia
Adult Education
When we think about the fight for racial equality in the South, we often don't consider the state of Virginia. We, often, think about Alabama and Mississippi having powerful Civil Rights stories. However, Virginia's story needs to be noted and told. "The story of Virginia throughout much of the 20th century - a state rising to meet the challenges of a modern America while resisting social, gender, and (especially) racial change. In doing so, Virginia's story reflects the two most significant themes in United States history over the last 100 years - the modernization of society, and this nation's often painful struggle to become a multi-racial, multicultural democracy." Virginia's access to equal education was very slow. In 20th-century Virginia, Jim Crow was front and center. Virginia had separate schools for white and blacks . . . but they were not equal. After Brown vs. Board of Education, Virginia proceeded extremely slow when integration was involved. In 1959, Prince Edward County closed the school district rather than integrate, denying non-white students access to public education for five years. It wasn't until 1968, that Virginia began to push for integration. School districts increased the number of non-whites in all white schools from 32%-79% in one school year.
In the classroom, I would examine the history of education equality in Prince Edward County. A timeline would prove useful to show Supreme Court decisions versus the time frame that integration really took place in Virginia. I would, also, have students research the life and work of Maggie Walker. She fought for equality of blacks and women alike.
Civil Rights Movement
Middle
I would assign students to research the Civil Rights Movement, by focusing on researching the various methods of protests that were carried out during this time. From Sit Ins to marches to demonstrations, students would learn how the Civil Right Movement was actually carried both here in Virginia and nationwide. Following their research, students would present their finding in a powerpoint presentation to the class.
4th Grade Teacher and the 20th Century
Elementary
I found the connection of the school bus to the students of today to be very beneficial. A school bus is something so ordinary to our students that they might not see it as anything other than a simple mode of transportation. We take many things for granted because we are used to having them, but these buses meant so much more to the African American children of this time. By looking at it during a different time period, with a different set of children than they are used to seeing, will provide insight and a new perspective of what buses could mean to them. They meant opportunity, triumph and even provided a way on the road to equality (literally and figuratively!). I think an image like this would serve as a great starting point for many discussions about history, empathy, differences and the impact of the changes in the 20th century. What a cool yet simple way to connect history to current times!
Virginia Then and Now
Elementary
I would show the various images as a hook for our unit on 20th Century VA. Students will create an "I notice/I wonder" chart for each image. After we discuss their thoughts, I will post the question "How do these images impact Virginia in the past and now?" Students will have time to share out in small groups and debate/discuss with their peers.
Virginia's Dark History
Elementary
Talking freely and openly about Virginia's dark past is important for students to do when discussing Virginia history. Depending on the ages of the children, will determine how much detail to go in to. I think having an open discussion about this topic is important. Obviously you would need to have rules in place and discussion topics, but I feel that a lot of the time, our students don't really have a voice and now they are impressionable. They witness things on TV or the internet that I'm sure they question and might not have the knowledge at home to discuss with parents. Unfortunately, students may be seeing students/people in today's world being treated like those in the past. As a class, you could compare and contrast such things and use it as a teaching tool.
The Long Journey begins with One Step
Elementary
Virginia has always been identified as a southern state and in many respects acted out as such. Students need to be aware of the way thigs were considered to be normal and correct, were not always that way. Most students learn about Famous African Americans during February, but this should not be the case. There are many famous African Americans who overcame the way things were and they should be revered and taught throughout the year. Maggie Walker, Doug Wilder, Arthur Ashe and Oliver Hill are just a few and present and opportunity to discuss their journeys and successes all year long.
Second Grade
Elementary
The changes in Virginia can be explained to second graders in easy to understand concepts. Since students learned about slavery and how it worked, they can transfer that understanding to the segregation laws that existed in Virginia in the past. How African Americans, even though slavery no longer exists, still had to fight a "civil war" in the 20th century. The idea that if people did not fight for civil rights, that today our class would look different. Our friends would be different.
Farmville Fliphunt
can be used for Upper Elementary through High School
I would create a Fliphunt for the students to learn and respond to the scars that the citizens of Prince Edward County received as a result of closing the schools down. Students would visit different sites and respond using videos sharing their answers to the questions that I posed.
7th grade 20th century VA
Middle
One thing that I do not spend a lot of time on, mainly because I don't have a lot of time, is how parts of Virginia fought hard against Brown v. Board of Education. I will show students this picture and the protest sign in the schools of Prince Edward County and we will talk about what they did instead of desegregating public schools. We will then discuss the response of the federal government in trying to force school districts into desegregation.
How is it fair?
Middle
Use the stories, Back of the Bus and Welcome Home written by Lin's mom - one written for a class assignment when she was a little girl during the Great Depression, and one written as a young college student at the close of World War II - to show students that many people did not like or even understood the purpose of segregation but still obeyed the law. Have the class discuss laws that are unjust or unfair (maybe talk about curfews or riding bikes and roller blades at school.)

Part Two: Then bring in Lin's write-up on Rosa Parks & the Montgomery Bus Boycott to show how people can act to get unfair laws changed.

Discuss what are they passionate about and would like to see changed.
20th Century Virginia
Middle
The idea of the contrast of Virginia seeking to keep up with a modern America and world while resisting the social change is one that allows students to try and see varying viewpoints and how they shaped the state both positively and negatively.
It is interesting the variety of industry that Virginia has attracted including factories, coal and computer chips. I was surprised that agriculture is still the largest economic industry accounting for 55 billion. It would be interesting for students to see how Virginia started prospering with agriculture and how that is still such a moneymaker.
The road to desegregation
Middle
I teach US History, and Civil Rights (including Jim Crow and segregation) is covered. While I was aware that certain school districts chose to close rather than integrate, I was not aware of the Massive Resistance movement led by Harry Byrd or the 1968 Green v. School Board USSC case that essentially forced schools to integrate in Virginia. I still have questions about how schools operated in certain districts when schools were closed. For example, the photo in this module of a PE county school bus in operation for a black school confused me, as does the fact that Jackson P Burley HS (now the school at which I teach) was in operation as Charlottesville's all-African American HS in the 1950s-1960s. How were these schools funded? Did they operate outside of the board of education policies? I find it interesting that, when given the choice between public education and maintaining segregation, Virginia schools eventually chose to desegregate. What is astonishing is how long the process of school integration took, and how acceptance of a law did not change attitudes and, in fact, incited more resistance and sometimes violence in order to maintain the status quo. I also found the fact of Virginia not ratifying the 19th amendment for 32 years after it passed to be surprising. How were women able to vote without Virginia ratification? Does this mean women did not vote in state or local elections, only national?
l
20th-Century Connections
Elementary
The 20th-century content is such an ample opportunity to allow students (in my case, fourth graders) the opportunity to engage in a topic that is both modern and applicable to life today.
If anything, I find it disheartening to teach about the changes that were made in the 20th-century to equalize the racial injustices and yet our society is still struggling with many of the same themes today. This topic, especially this year, has excited many of my students to become opinionated about history. I have never had students so feverous about this topic. I think that there are enough events, movies, media that depict similar issues today that they feel a personal connection to this era.
In order to apply this to my classroom, I would like to think of a way to roleplay the Davis v. Prince Edward County case and the sequential events leading up to the event. I think that a PBL could help describe the process that it took from Barbara John's strike to Brown v. Board of Education in order to enact desegregation. I think that it is important to impress the patience and diligence that it took to create this kind of change in society.
20th Century Virginia
Elementary
I think that one of the most powerful ways for the students to understand 20th century Virginia is through photographs, newspaper articles, and primary sources. This is a time when photography was commonplace so having the students make inferences using them would be beneficial. Also, finding speeches/ TV spots of the people actually involved can help students make connections. I teach in Norfolk, so focusing on the Norfolk 17 would really hit home for my students.
20th Century Virginia
Elementary
I think that one of the most powerful ways for the students to understand 20th century Virginia is through photographs, newspaper articles, and primary sources. This is a time when photography was commonplace so having the students make inferences using them would be beneficial. Also, finding speeches/ TV spots of the people actually involved can help students make connections. I teach in Norfolk, so focusing on the Norfolk 17 would really hit home for my students.
World Connections
Middle
As an 8th Grade World Connections instructor, I don't teach the same curriculum as Virginia Studies teachers. However, we do touch upon some common topics and themes as part of our World Geography & History curriculum. We discuss European colonialism, African slavery, agriculture, industrialization, and several other topics/themes, particularly during the U.S./Canada Unit. In a class called "World Connections," I try to help students connect the life that they know in rural Pittsylvania County and nearby City of Danville to the "bigger picture" of their state (to some degree), their region (the South or Mid-Atlantic states), their country, and their world. Our school was built in an old tobacco field, and many students can relate to that agricultural product, since it is still grown, sold, and consumed in our area. Interestingly enough, a neighboring tobacco field has recently been converted into a solar panel "farm" for electricity generation for "the grid." So, students are witnessing the past, present, and future -- the evolution from an agricultural economy to a high tech industry -- literally "in our backyard." Moreover, the City of Danville had the Dan River Textile Plant at the heart of its economy and downtown district for over a century (1882 - 2004). Many of my students had parents and granparents who had worked there in the city, again connecting them to industrialization and modernization of Virginia during the 20th Century, but then the painful transition to a global economy. I very much liked the postcard of the shoe company. It makes me want to see if I can find a similar image to use for the Dan River Textile Plant. I like utilizing old photographs, drawings, and artifacts to help students connect to whatever topic we are discussing.
World Connections
Middle
As an 8th Grade World Connections instructor, I don't teach the same curriculum as Virginia Studies teachers. However, we do touch upon some common topics and themes as part of our World Geography & History curriculum. We discuss European colonialism, African slavery, agriculture, industrialization, and several other topics/themes, particularly during the U.S./Canada Unit. In a class called "World Connections," I try to help students connect the life that they know in rural Pittsylvania County and nearby City of Danville to the "bigger picture" of their state (to some degree), their region (the South or Mid-Atlantic states), their country, and their world. Our school was built in an old tobacco field, and many students can relate to that agricultural product, since it is still grown, sold, and consumed in our area. Interestingly enough, a neighboring tobacco field has recently been converted into a solar panel "farm" for electricity generation for "the grid." So, students are witnessing the past, present, and future -- the evolution from an agricultural economy to a high tech industry -- literally "in our backyard." Moreover, the City of Danville had the Dan River Textile Plant at the heart of its economy and downtown district for over a century (1882 - 2004). Many of my students had parents and granparents who had worked there in the city, again connecting them to industrialization and modernization of Virginia during the 20th Century, but then the painful transition to a global economy. I very much liked the postcard of the shoe company. It makes me want to see if I can find a similar image to use for the Dan River Textile Plant. I like utilizing old photographs, drawings, and artifacts to help students connect to whatever topic we are discussing.
World Connections
Middle
As an 8th Grade World Connections instructor, I don't teach the same curriculum as Virginia Studies teachers. However, we do touch upon some common topics and themes as part of our World Geography & History curriculum. We discuss European colonialism, African slavery, agriculture, industrialization, and several other topics/themes, particularly during the U.S./Canada Unit. In a class called "World Connections," I try to help students connect the life that they know in rural Pittsylvania County and nearby City of Danville to the "bigger picture" of their state (to some degree), their region (the South or Mid-Atlantic states), their country, and their world. Our school was built in an old tobacco field, and many students can relate to that agricultural product, since it is still grown, sold, and consumed in our area. Interestingly enough, a neighboring tobacco field has recently been converted into a solar panel "farm" for electricity generation for "the grid." So, students are witnessing the past, present, and future -- the evolution from an agricultural economy to a high tech industry -- literally "in our backyard." Moreover, the City of Danville had the Dan River Textile Plant at the heart of its economy and downtown district for over a century (1882 - 2004). Many of my students had parents and granparents who had worked there in the city, again connecting them to industrialization and modernization of Virginia during the 20th Century, but then the painful transition to a global economy. I very much liked the postcard of the shoe company. It makes me want to see if I can find a similar image to use for the Dan River Textile Plant. I like utilizing old photographs, drawings, and artifacts to help students connect to whatever topic we are discussing.
World Connections
Middle
As an 8th Grade World Connections instructor, I don't teach the same curriculum as Virginia Studies teachers. However, we do touch upon some common topics and themes as part of our World Geography & History curriculum. We discuss European colonialism, African slavery, agriculture, industrialization, and several other topics/themes, particularly during the U.S./Canada Unit.
Desegregation in Lynchburg
Elementary
It would be interesting to explore the logistics of how desegregation in their city came to be. When examining a current school districting map, where one goes to elementary school make little to no sense geographically and economically often. Is this due to decisions that were made over 50 years ago? Or has time and change redrawn the districting lines?
20th Century
Middle
Many of the issues of 20th century Virginia are still the issues of the 21st century in Virginia. Students can study these issues and make connections to their world today. Students could use technology to recreate photos and images from the 20th century substituting disenfranchised groups or events. For example the stories of people refusing to integrate schools of the 1950s have parallels to our Southern border immigration battles of today. And the white nationalist rally in Charlottesville has parallels to the lynchings of the early 1900s.
20th Century VA
Middle
The 20th century in Virginia has been a time of change. Once we have studied the time periods through thematic units, students could create a timeline of events in the 1900s. Virginia was impacted from the effects of Reconstruction in the early 1900's, the suffragist movements, involvement in the World Wars, the Civil Rights court case decisions impacting education in our state, and the growth and changes in a growing agricultural and industrial state. Choosing and reflecting on one of these units, students could create a newspaper front page to reflect the big news story of the day. Using a news broadcast format would be a fun way to incorporate technology in our class as well.
20 th Century Virginia
Middle
I have a Scholastic Scope article on Barbara Johns and her fight to get adequate and equal facilities for the students of Robert R. Moton High School. It also mentions how Oliver Hill came to the students defense and represented them to have better facilities. I want the students to understand that they to have a voice and should be heard.
How constitutional decisions affect students
Middle
The desegregation era in Virginia gives a good opportunity to show students that weighty constitutional issues can directly affect their lives as students. By showing the cause (the court decision) and the effect (students bused to desegregated schools), they can see how court decisions are not just arguments on paper. I would like my students to understand that this era was not long ago and that there are still many sensitivities on both sides of the controversies around desegregation and busing. With middle school students, I find it challenging to tackle sensitive racial issues like this, but I would like to at least bring up the racial conflicts in 20th century Virginia so they can consider where they might see reflections today.
Applying information about 20th Century Virginia
Elementary
Virginia in the 20th century can be studied by comparing and contrasting the changes and development in economics, agriculture, politics and education. I would use a timeline to show changes and to mark major milestones in our Commonwealth's history such as schools being closed, integration and the first black governor of Virginia.
My best activity
dfjlasdjflasjdflajdfljdl;ajdfl;ajsdf
test
test
Final activity
This one should be really good.

Comments

Tatana- I love this idea of incorporating technology with teaching the unit on 20th century VA. Super creative and the students will surely be engaged. Great idea!

I like the lesson above in which the class studies the connection between court decisions and their lives. That really would get kids thinking about how laws and courts play an important part in their lives and are not just a separate part of our society.

Interesting thought! I would also like to have my students check out what it was like in their town during this era. Do they have grandparents that can talk about this and maybe learn first-hand what was it like back then.

Some really thought provoking insight on here. I always love to read others application of the same material covered, and see the creativity and the thought process behind something I may have missed. I l live in SW portion of VA, so I work for the school system that was pictured mining the coal. So that was pretty cool to see a local application . I really have enjoyed this class and learned a lot .

Patrick is spot on with using Remember the Titans! It's an excellent example of desegregation in Virginia. It covers both perspectives and how hard it was to integrate. There was lots of opposition. This movie is kid friendly and gets the point across. I would incorporate it after using the photo of the kids getting on the bus in Prince Edward.

20th century Virginia was really interesting to me because it served as a refresher about the Civil Rights era and the important figures and events that made our state and nation into what it is today. I never knew that Maggie Walker was one of the first women to be president of a bank. Very interesting to hear about different people you don't normally learn about. I did appreciate this module because it may serve my students well as we teach them about their rights and freedoms that they now have because of terrific leaders and events during the late 1900's. When this concept gets taught to our students, my hope is that they are able to appreciate their freedoms and rights more than usual.

I like the Idea of linking family history to past events. I see someone on here lived in the area an experience first hand the impact on segregation in VA.

The county where I teach is home of the first Virginia High School to close under the policy of Massive Resistance. When teaching about Massive Resistance in the classroom, we always examine historical markers within our community and discuss how WC High School was the first HS to close in Virginia during Massive Resistance. Students are not only learning about state /national history, but are able to make connections of national events in their own town.

I have used "Remember the Titans" in previous class I taught and it is really good. Like many of you, making use of those people who have lived this history is great. I was blessed to have great people visit and talk to my classes. One of our residents was in the "Band of Brothers" as well as a coalminer. He had a wealth of information to tell us.

Lots of good information about Virginia's history in the class content and good ideas from others about how to teach this history. Very glad I took the class and will use some of your ideas along the way as I teach about Virginia and U.S. Government!

I like the idea of creating a comparison of Then and Now in education. Education has definitely come a long way. I also liked the idea of making life-sized cut outs of some of the people from then and allowing students to think about them and write about them. There are many great thinking ideas that could be used in a classroom to help students to become more engaged into learning about Virginia History through Virginia Studies. That is exactly what we will do, is study and learn more about Virginia.

I really like the comment on using the two movies "Remember the Titans" and Hidden Figures" to compare and contrast the time periods. My principal took our entire middle school to see "Hidden Figures." It was wonderful to see the student reactions. It really emphasized the "separate but equal" theme throughout. And we had much discussion about segregation, desegregation, and how the government played a role during that era.

Instructions

Congratulations on completing the module! Read and comment on classmates’ ideas here. Return to My Course to move to the next module.

Edward H. Peeples Prince Edward County (Va.) Public Schools
This site from Virginia Commonwealth University features resources related to Prince Edward County Schools, efforts to desegregate the schools after Brown vs. the Board of Education, and the massive resistance response by the district.

School Desegregation in Norfolk, Virginia
This site from Old Dominion University profiles the "Norfolk 17", African American student activists who worked to desegregate Norfolk public schools. The site features teacher resources with connections to Standards of Learning.

Massive Resistance through Political Cartoons
In this video, teacher Stacy Hoeflich and her fourth grade students analyze two political cartoons related to Virginia's massive resistance response to desegregation.